Reading Linux

Apr 26, 2007 14:07 # 44439

null tells about...

Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

?% | 2

Foreword

So with Microsoft ramming Vista down their helpless users' throats... err, winning their hearts for the most advanced Windows ever, and knowing that I'll eventually be required to "upgrade" my XP, I'm once more looking to free my main PC from Redmond's claws. From previous attempts I know that this is not easy, as I expect my future system to have all the advantages and features of Windows, but none of its disadvantages. Also, the new system should be more advanced in every aspect, but not too different from what I'm used to.

(Skip the following text block if you're either not interested in Macs at all or a religious Mac user.)

For a while I thought of OS X as the answer to all of my questions... mainly thanks to the generosity of Orchid who bought a second-hand Mac and placed it in my room. It seemed perfect - easy to handle, a beautiful UI, and reasonably fast even for today's computing needs (dual 1.25GHz with 768 Megs of RAM). Even the OS (Tiger) was up to date.
Then I started discovering its downsides. Yes, Macs do have them. *fends off raging Mac users*
Take WLAN connectivity, f'r instance: The Mac way to connect your computer is simple enough - buy AirPort card, plug AirPort card in, watch "Shall I make stuff work" dialog appear, click "Yes, please" button, stuff works.
However, with a third-party card it's a bit more complicated: Plug card in, watch Mac act as if nothing had happened, manually download&install driver, reboot Mac, manually configure network card. Then, after every boot-up, log in and use the driver utility to manually connect to your WLAN.
Bluetooth: While my Bluetooth USB stick is recognised and appears to be working, I can't make connections from or to any device. There are probably super-expensive iTooth™ modules that Just Work™, but I'm not gonna look for them.
When my cell phone is connected to the computer via USB, it asks whether it should identify itself as a phone or emulate a flash drive. My Mac refuses to acknowledge its existence in either mode. Well, besides a "This device requires too much power and will not work" pop-up when I plug it into the handy USB connector at the keyboard instead of crawling under the desk in search of the USB connector on the back of the computer. But it does that too with my regular USB flash drive, so I guess the phone is not to blame.
Long story short, the Mac is cool but it does not do everything I need, and I lack the expertise to fix it (but so does Google, so that's okay).
Besides, my main machine is a neat 3GHz AMD with lots of HD space, and it'd be kind of a waste to just let it sit there unused.

Soo, back to square one, with a mental note to keep the Mac for prestige reasons.

Having tried the Dapper Drake release a while ago, I decided that Ubuntu was nice but needed more work in order to suit me. (I'm a helluva modest person, ain't I?)
Then, just at the right time (lots of Vista talk), Feisty Fawn was released.

Feisty Fawn rocks, because...

It's simple, part 1. Every Linux distro I've ever tried came with 43 text editors (2/3 of them being different versions/incarnations of vi), 8 web browsers, 6 desktop environments, 3 word processors, 14 media players, and so on etc. pp.
Ubuntu has one browser (Firefox), one office suite (OOo 2.2), one highly configurable desktop environment (Gnome for the 'standard' Ubuntu). I've never seen a start menu as tidy and clear before, and for every possible task there's exactly one item, and that item will get the job done. If you still need more software, it's one apt-get or three mouse clicks away.

It's simple, part 2. The installation is painless, and besides the awkward partitioning tool I've yet to encounter a text or program that doesn't make perfect sense. And it all comes in my native language.

It's simple, part 3. There's an open-source nVidia driver, and a 'closed' one. It asks you which one you prefer and installs it. The installation is painless and works. And that's the last thing you'll need to do to configure your video stuff. It even determined the correct screen resolution for my monitor on its own.

It works. I'm happy to say that Feisty Fawn is the first distro to correctly recognise and configure all of my hardware without any human interaction whatsoever.
The network was up & running in no time, although turning off DHCP and setting a static IP required a reboot for some reason.
The nicest surprise was when I wanted to install my printers. Instead of the usual "how is the printer connected to the computer", "what brand/model is it" dialogs I expected, I was presented with a list of local (USB) and network (TCP/IP) printers of which I could choose one, click OK and that was it.

It boots. This may be nothing spectacular to you, but you wouldn't believe how many distros' boot loaders go belly-up when they have to manage Windows on hda1 and Linux on hdb1 - either they choke on the Linux boot process, or I need to play around with fixboot and fixmbr from the Windows recovery CD to at least get Windows working again. However, my system now boasts a grub that will boot both Windows and Linux. And it didn't require any manual configuration at all.

It's got security right. You work as a normal user, and when you want to do admin stuff, you enter your password. Easy access to root powers without much hassle whenever you need them, but a request for confirmation when something important happens to the system. No need to always work as root, none of that "users always work as admins when they shouldn't, so let's just castrate the admin account until they can't start Notepad without entering their password twice" Vista crap.

It looks good.
The default theme is elegant and straightforward. Windows users will feel right at home. For additional eye candy one may wish to install Beryl, albeit Ubuntu warns you about possible stability issues. (I had to cold-boot the machine once after the desktop disappeared and the keyboard stopped working.) Beryl (a derivate of Compiz) is Aero done right. You get the fun and eye candy - wobbly windows, 3d desktop switching, fancy alt-tab window previews - but unlike Aero/Flip-3D, the eye candy doesn't get in the way of productivity.

It's got everything you need.
Actually it doesn't, but whatever you might desire is just one easy one-step installation away. And that's okay, because everything besides a very common set of applications should only be installed at the user's explicit request.
(Did I mention that the entire thing fits on a single CD?)

Things I'd like to see

There's a theme manager. I can only preview the themes tho, not apply them. I'm not sure if this because of Beryl.

Wine is installed but doesn't seem to work. I haven't had the time for troubleshooting; hopefully it's something that can be fixed easily.

A function to mount SMB shares (i.e. actually map them into the file system) would be nice. I can connect to shares and get the corresponding icons on the desktop, but they're not mount'ed, so not all programs can access them.

Also, my Bluetooth seems to work, bluez is available on the command line, but there's no Bluetooth icon or anything GUI-related. I'd like to access my cell phone, at the very least to transfer files; a function to synchronize contacts and the calendar with Evolution would be perfect.

Conclusion

Ubuntu rocks. Feisty Fawn even more so. I might just make the switch and abandon Windows this time.

When life hands you a lemon, that's 40% of your RDA of vitamin C taken care of.

This post was edited by null on Apr 27, 2007.

Apr 27, 2007 12:31 # 44442

ginsterbusch *** replies...

Re: Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

?% | 1

Ubuntu has one browser (Firefox), one office suite (OOo 2.2), one highly configurable desktop environment (Gnome for the 'standard' Ubuntu). I've never seen a start menu as tidy and clear before, and for every possible task there's exactly one item, and that item will get the job done. If you still need more software, it's one apt-get or three mouse clicks away.

Well, and if you dont like Gnome - like I do - you have the choice to select out of at least four other tastes of Ubuntu:

  • Kubuntu - KDE; the one I'm using (but heavily 'pimped' with other stuff right out of Synaptic and the './configure make && make install'-procedure)

  • Edubuntu - Gnome, but enhanced for educational use

  • Xubuntu - using XFCE window manager

  • Fluxbuntu - using my beloved Fluxbox window manager (which I've installed nevertheless - thanks to apt-get and Synaptic)

cu, w0lf.

ps: but I'm not going to switch to Faisty Fawn for the next 2 months or so - a) never touch a running system b) especially if its a production environment c) thus we wait till all the start(l)ing bugs have been ironed out ;)

beards are cool. every villain has one!

Apr 27, 2007 12:33 # 44443

ginsterbusch *** replies...

Re: Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

?% | 1

Ubuntu rocks. Feisty Fawn even more so. I might just make the switch and abandon Windows this time.

Since begin of March 2007, I know Windows only from looking at other people's monitors and having some installs safely put in a cage inside of virtual machines ;)

cu, w0lf.

beards are cool. every villain has one!

Apr 27, 2007 13:47 # 44444

null replies...

Re: Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

?% | 1

Yeah, but sometimes it's not easy to make the switch. I've just spent half an hour looking for a program to burn AVI files to DVD, and it's not easy when you don't know exactly where to look (I for one don't).

When life hands you a lemon, that's 40% of your RDA of vitamin C taken care of.

Apr 27, 2007 16:51 # 44445

ginsterbusch *** replies...

Re: Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

?% | 1

I've just spent half an hour looking for a program to burn AVI files to DVD, and it's not easy when you don't know exactly where to look (I for one don't).

AFAIK 'AVI' is a container file format, thus, it depends on what movie data type this specific file contains. ;)

The Ubuntuusers-Wiki shows a lot you can add to your basic Ubuntu installation to get that done. GSpot should work with WINE or a VMware, too.

cu, w0lf.

ps: I really wish there was DokuWiki markup support - its sooo hard to write entries whilest having only one hand free (the other one's occupied holding a piece of cheese-sausage-bread) :-/

beards are cool. every villain has one!

This post was edited by ginsterbusch on Apr 27, 2007.

Apr 28, 2007 05:35 # 44451

null replies...

Re: Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

The Ubuntuusers-Wiki shows a lot you can add

Ooh thanks, this looks nice.

its sooo hard to write entries whilest having only one hand free

Well, there's always the one-handed Dvorak keyboard!

When life hands you a lemon, that's 40% of your RDA of vitamin C taken care of.

This post was edited by null on Apr 28, 2007.

Apr 27, 2007 16:55 # 44446

ginsterbusch *** replies...

Re: Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

The network was up & running in no time, although turning off DHCP and setting a static IP required a reboot for some reason.

sudo ifconfig eth0 down

(pause for a minute or so)

sudo ifconfig eth0 up

(pause for 2-3 minute or so)

.. didnt work?

cu, w0lf.

beards are cool. every villain has one!

This post was edited by ginsterbusch on Apr 27, 2007.

Apr 28, 2007 05:34 # 44450

null replies...

Re: Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

Ifconfig worked, but what I wanted was the static IP to replace the one given by the DHCP server. I figured it's not worth wasting a lot of time on it, as I needed to reboot anyway after the installation of Beryl.

When life hands you a lemon, that's 40% of your RDA of vitamin C taken care of.

Apr 30, 2007 07:45 # 44457

ginsterbusch *** replies...

Re: Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

I figured it's not worth wasting a lot of time on it, as I needed to reboot anyway after the installation of Beryl.

Oh .. well, then .. whatever.

BTW: Was it worth installing Beryl? I'm probably NOT going to use any of the oh-so-sightful 3D-desktops in favor of my beloved Fluxbox-KDM-combination. Others wont, too.

cu, w0lf.

beards are cool. every villain has one!

Apr 30, 2007 17:46 # 44458

null replies...

Re: Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

Was it worth installing Beryl?

Well, with my limited experience I'd say it depends on how much of a sucker for eye candy you are. :-)
If stability is important to you, I suggest you avoid Beryl. It crashed my box several times, and when I switch desktops too often I eventually end up with an empty desktop and a blocked keyboard (not even control-alt-backspace or -delete will work).

On the other hand, I've found myself missing the "wobbly windows" and "rubber band" effects on my XP box at the office today...

When life hands you a lemon, that's 40% of your RDA of vitamin C taken care of.

Sep 03, 2007 21:05 # 44898

oKtosiTe * has a suggestion...

Re: Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

?% | 1

What about SSH-ing into the box from your Mac? In Ubuntu's case, this does require installing openssh first.

Or is it?

Sep 03, 2007 23:59 # 44900

ginsterbusch *** replies...

Re: Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

?% | 1

Yeah, but a sudo apt-get install openssh-server is easily done ;)

cu, w0lf.

beards are cool. every villain has one!

Sep 11, 2007 20:29 # 44922

oKtosiTe * replies...

Re: Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

Or even

apt-get install ssh

if you want an ssh client and server.

Or is it?

Sep 12, 2007 08:13 # 44923

ginsterbusch *** replies...

Re: Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

?% | 1

The ssh-client itself gets shipped with the base install of Ubuntu - so you only need to install the server if you really need it ;)

cu, w0lf.

beards are cool. every villain has one!

Oct 28, 2007 01:33 # 45168

Aynjell *** replies...

Re: Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

?% | 2

I switched to Ubuntu today, probably permanently. After several months of gentoo use, the little quirks finally got to me. Ubuntu just works, installs in minutes as compared to days for gentoo, and gentoo's main stength is shared by ubuntu (IMO): it's HUGE ASS package repository. If I want a package, ubuntu has it. Actually, things I wanted on gentoo are available for ubuntu (but weren't on gentoo, obviously).

7.10 is awesome, enough said. Oh, and compiz comes stock. o.O

I should be ashamed of myself.

Oct 28, 2007 06:59 # 45169

null replies...

Re: Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

?% | 1

Oh, and compiz comes stock.

Ooh, is it stable yet?

When life hands you a lemon, that's 40% of your RDA of vitamin C taken care of.

This post was edited by null on Oct 28, 2007.

Oct 28, 2007 15:47 # 45172

Aynjell *** replies...

Re: Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

?% | 1

For the most part. I can't say it's crashed on me. I don't care for the impact it has on games, though, so I simply turn it off. Metacity is good enough for me...

Give 7.10 a try. I hated ubuntu until 7.10, when it simply became THE linux to use. I'm gonna write a post about why I switched from gentoo to ubuntu, as there were a LOT of reasons.

I should be ashamed of myself.

Oct 30, 2007 08:59 # 45184

oKtosiTe * replies...

Re: Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

?% | 1

Haven't had any crashes or freezes yet either. Of course having the "right" video hardware helps. YMMV.
I suspect that now that it's enabled in Ubuntu by default, remaining bugs will be stomped out of troublesome applications (and Compiz Fusion itself) more quickly.

Or is it?

This post was edited by oKtosiTe on Oct 30, 2007.

Oct 30, 2007 08:56 # 45183

oKtosiTe * replies...

Re: Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

After putting it off for months, I too have made that switch. Well, something similar. I've finally moved over my home partition from Gentoo to Ubuntu (music collection, artwork, etc.) on my main box.
Using Gentoo has been highly educational, but I decided I spent too much time staying up-to-date and too little developing.
I still need to move my server back to Debian, though...

Or is it?

Jun 13, 2007 02:45 # 44718

mclaincausey *** replies...

Re: Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

?% | 1

Still easy, using the startup scripts in /etc/init.d

can't remember exactly where it is in there, but an example would be

%sudo /etc/init.d/network restart

or if you don't put the "restart" there, it will come back with an error dialog teling you what possible options you can pass to the startup script. This is not just useful for your network stack, but for anything that launches during boot. Try
% /etc/init.d <TAB>

to see what all is in the folder.

cheers,
Mac

Ewige Blumenkraft!

Jun 13, 2007 07:11 # 44720

null smiles...

Re: Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

%sudo /etc/init.d/network restart

Ooh, thanks for this info. Why do the obvious and simple ideas always come to mind the last?

Oh, and hi!

When life hands you a lemon, that's 40% of your RDA of vitamin C taken care of.

May 20, 2007 19:58 # 44562

yoshi314 * replies...

Re: Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

very Linux distro I've ever tried came with 43 text editors

so, in category of text-editors, does feisty come with vim or emacs? oowriter is merely a notepad.

some people hate feisty for awful wifi setup problems. mostly network-manager breaking more stuff than it fixes.

"Life is a queue. You come in, hang around for a bit, get some service, then depart."

May 21, 2007 06:53 # 44566

null replies...

Re: Ubuntu: Feisty Fawn (or: Why you should use Linux)

so, in category of text-editors, does feisty come with vim or emacs?

vi is there, I haven't even looked for emacs yet. (I already have an OS, ha ha ha.) I must admit the editor of my choice is still my beloved UltraEdit; it runs quite well on Wine.

When life hands you a lemon, that's 40% of your RDA of vitamin C taken care of.

This post was edited by null on May 21, 2007.

May 23, 2007 07:48 # 44573

andromacha *** wants to note...

Vista from a non-geek user :P

As I think I mentioned in one of my previous posts, after having destroyed my poor Rudy by spilling coke on it, my dad was so generous to give me a new laptop for my birthday. This time, no liquids are allowed near it! (even though it was a mere accident that I couldn't in any way avoid) :P

Well, of course my new laptop has Vista on. I was even considering getting one with XP, but... it cost more!! Exactly the same laptop, with the same features, only with the older OS... I guess that's the way Microsoft convinces the users to choose the latest OS! :P

Anyway, at first I was quite upset with it. It is different than XP, or than any other Windows version for that matter. According to me (so from a non-geek point of view) while the ability to do more and more things increased with every new version of Windows (maybe exclude Millennium Edition :P), the look and the things in Windows remained more or less the same. I mean, I remember the main great difference in Win95, where they enhanced the way to look for things on your HD, by converting the file manager of Win 3.0 and following into something more (now, don't expect me to be able to explain that in English, because it happened too long ago, and in Italian (at least for me) :P). But the looks and everything was quite the same.

And it's been like this until Vista came along. When I first turn on this laptop, I found myself almost lost. I found that all the names had been changed! I didn't know where to look for my stuff :P I couldn't find the "Risorse del computer" anymore, because now it's called "Computer", and everything was misplaced, beginning from the start menu. At the moment I still don't like it so much, because I am still too used to XP, but I guess I am getting more and more used to the new OS every time I use my laptop.

At this point, I wondered if I was the only one who was crazy and thought that things had been messed around. So I started to search the internet, to verify what I was thinking. And on MS site I found some explanations. They basically said that things have been messed around to be more "usable", and easier for the average user. Well, hell it's not like that at all!! Maybe for those who never owned a computer before it is easier, but for me the result is that I get f***ing lost in this darn OS!!!

Well, these are the downsides. But let me tell you about a cool thing that happened. If the computer is switched off accidentally (ahem, I didn't do that on purpose, it's just that this Toshiba is so different from my Dell, and I hit the wrong button at the wrong time), Vista doesn't get all grumpy as WinXP. It will reboot, fix the reg files or whatever it fixes (as I said, I am not a geek), and then it will load the OS just like it was before. So, perchance you had Word open, you still have it open, and you find out that you have not lost your work. I don't know if it was just a coincidence, but it happened twice. One time because I hit the button, and the second time because I thought it was plugged in when it wasn't and the battery went dead. I thought that maybe this saving of things would be appliable to the second case if anything, but it seems that this OS is intelligent enough to understand if you made a mistake and the computer is switched off abruptly.

Italy no longer accepts illegal immigrants. Mr. B sink their boats!!!!!!!

May 23, 2007 07:53 # 44574

null throws in his two cents...

Re: Vista from a non-geek user :P

It will reboot, fix the reg files or whatever it fixes (as I said, I am not a geek), and then it will load the OS just like it was before. So, perchance you had Word open, you still have it open, and you find out that you have not lost your work.

Not to spoil your enthusiasm, but are you sure this isn't just the "suspend to disk" feature?

(Also, your computer doesn't shut down properly when you hit the Power button? What century is it from? You can set Windows to display the shutdown dialog, but its default behaviour is to just initiate a quick shutdown.)

When life hands you a lemon, that's 40% of your RDA of vitamin C taken care of.

This post was edited by null on May 23, 2007.

May 23, 2007 07:58 # 44576

andromacha *** replies...

Re: Vista from a non-geek user :P

Not to spoil your enthusiasm, but are you sure this isn't just the "suspend to disk" feature?

Ahem no. I hit the button long enough (I am talking about the hardware part, not the software to shut it down, and heck now I will look like a dumbass for having done this :P)

(Also, your computer doesn't shut down properly when you hit the Power button? What century is it from? You can set Windows to display the shutdown dialog, but its default behaviour is to just initiate a quick shutdown.)

You're saying that if you're in the middle of something, and you hit the power button long enough the computer will switch off properly? Somehow I don't think so... I remember having done it before on the older computer and then XP was breaking my balls with all the shit it had to do to fix itself up.

Italy no longer accepts illegal immigrants. Mr. B sink their boats!!!!!!!

This post was edited by andromacha on May 23, 2007.

May 23, 2007 08:01 # 44578

null replies...

Re: Vista from a non-geek user :P

You're saying that if you're in the middle of something, and you hit the power button long enough the computer will switch off properly?

Well, no. On most computers, if you press it briefly it will pass a "hey, somebody just hit the power button" message to the OS. If you press it for four (usually) seconds the power will be actually shut off.

When life hands you a lemon, that's 40% of your RDA of vitamin C taken care of.

May 23, 2007 19:26 # 44581

ginsterbusch *** replies...

Re: Vista from a non-geek user :P

So, perchance you had Word open, you still have it open, and you find out that you have not lost your work.

Uhm .. groovy. At least for windoze users. Session managment is something I've been enjoying with Linux since I dont know what times. ;->

You might want to read some of the stuff Sebastian wrote about having to use Windows "Fistfuck" Vista. On of the more annoying things was - at least for me it would be the case - that you basically have to buy 80% of all the software you have been using within WinXP once again. That might by not so expensive if its just about some ol' AV solutions, but gets quite tasty if we start talking about Adobe Photoshop, AutoCAD and similar high-priced state-of-the-art programs.

cu, w0lf.

beards are cool. every villain has one!

May 24, 2007 06:55 # 44582

null rants...

Re: Vista from a non-geek user :P

but gets quite tasty if we start talking about Adobe Photoshop, AutoCAD and similar high-priced state-of-the-art programs.

Photoshop runs fine with Wine. Heh.

Well, the good news about Vista is that it's apparently not always 30-40% slower than XP, as rumour had it. Only most games experience such a drastic slowdown, thanks to Microsoft removing OpenGL support from Vista. Regular applications are only up to 10% slower, unless your system boasts more than 1GB of RAM, in which case the applications you use often might start faster (but still run slower once they're started).
And of course a default install of Vista eats 3-4 times as much RAM as my current XP installation, but hey, that's the price you gotta pay for the many technical advances you get, right? Like e.g. the several MB of DRM code which will allow content providers (MPAA, RIAA) to comfortably restrict your use of media you bought in any way they want, and which is also quite possibly a convenient way for anybody to introduce new 'DRM' code into your system which, thanks to the concept of protected processes, you can't control.

When life hands you a lemon, that's 40% of your RDA of vitamin C taken care of.

May 24, 2007 11:53 # 44583

andromacha *** replies...

Re: Vista from a non-geek user :P

Definitely I wasn't looking forward to buying a new computer with the new OS, I must admit this. But fortunately, not being a geek freak like you guys, I have to say that it is quite user-friendly. At least once you get used to it. Right now I am still in the "where is my stuff?!" phase, but I think it's because I still think that I have XP. I turn on the computer, and I am still expecting XP to boot up, but of course there is Vista, and every single time I am a little appalled :P

Honestly what I can't really get past (so far) is the fact that they changed names and in some cases also the appearance of the icon. So when I am looking for something, it is not a mechanical immediate action as it was for XP. I would say that this is really the only downside so far for me. But also keep in mind that I don't expect (or have the pretence of) to do so much as you do with your computer. I don't really tamper with it, I don't program, nor am I interested in performances so much :P I just don't want a stupid machine that takes a year to boot up, and I have to say that this one loads the OS quite faster than the other one, so if anything, I would give it a plus. Again, from a non geek perspective of course... but this one I am currently using has 1 Gb Ram, the other one, with XP had 512 Mb.

Let's see other techie stuff... hmm the other was an Intel centrino, I don't remember the clock frequency though. This is a centrino core 2, 1.66 GHz (I think that the other one might have been 1.4 something, but I am not sure). So I don't know if all this could lead this laptop to boot faster than the other (provided that this has Vista on, whereas the old one had XP). All I can say is that as far as I am concerned it has a good performance. But then, I use it mainly to study, work on my papers, and soon my final dissertation, surf the web (posting some crap here)... games... Well I happen to play Settlers, another game about pirates... I am into whatever is simulation I would say. So probably I don't need such high performances as other "serious players", and therefore I can't really give a faithful judgment.

Italy no longer accepts illegal immigrants. Mr. B sink their boats!!!!!!!

May 24, 2007 13:56 # 44586

null has all the information you need...

Re: Vista from a non-geek user :P

Right now I am still in the "where is my stuff?!" phase

AFAIK in Vista the approach is to display less options and have the user use Spotlight Windows Search instead. The recommended way to find your stuff is thus to enter (part of) its name into the Search field in the start menu and cross your fingers.

When life hands you a lemon, that's 40% of your RDA of vitamin C taken care of.

Sep 09, 2007 16:19 # 44919

zen *** replies...

Good point

?% | 1

That's a really good point.
I hear people say "I don't want to have to learn all this shit all over again", as their reason for not going Linux, or Mac, or what have you. But the truth is, with each new Windows offering, they change that crap all the time.
One still has to learn this stuff all over again.

God I hate Windows.

Once Fred Neitszche declared God is Dead, f*ck became the most important word in the English languag

Sep 09, 2007 16:16 # 44918

zen *** replies...

Why you should use Linux

?% | 2

Thank you, all you geeks, for keeping us updated on all thing NOT windows.

I think the main "objection" to Linux, or any non-windows is the interoperability of using Redmon programs on non- boxes.

I might mnot use Linux cause the programs aren't there, but I still want to know about other alternatives to Bill Gates empire.

Thanks for this post....very useful.

Once Fred Neitszche declared God is Dead, f*ck became the most important word in the English languag

Sep 10, 2007 22:14 # 44920

ginsterbusch *** replies...

Re: Why you should use Linux

I might mnot use Linux cause the programs aren't there, but I still want to know about other alternatives to Bill Gates empire.

Which programs exactly? There are lots of (sometimes even better) alternatives ;)

And if all fails, you still can try to get your favorite app running with WINE or some virtual machine using eg. QEMU or VirtualBox.

cu, w0lf.

beards are cool. every villain has one!

Sep 11, 2007 05:00 # 44921

null tells about...

Re: Why you should use Linux

I might mnot use Linux cause the programs aren't there

Well, it depends on what programs you need. You can surf the 'net with Firefox or Opera, do office stuff with OpenOffice, play any imaginable kind of audio or video file with mplayer or VLC, create/mix audio with Audacity, ... some people even claim that they know how to use the GIMP for photo editing (though my personal Photoshop-spoiled opinion is that the GIMP is a PITA to use, but as stated above that's just my opinion).

If that's not enough for you you can install the original MS Office suite and other popular Windows programs with CrossOver.

The reason not to use Linux that I've heard most is that you need to build/fix the system yourself using lots of low-level stuff. However with user-friendly distros like Ubuntu this is less and less true. I think for a person who is totally new to computers, both are about equally hard or easy to learn. Windows' main advantage is its enormous user base which practically forces software companies to invest most of their time into making their stuff work well with Windows; Linux and other OSes are merely optional.

When life hands you a lemon, that's 40% of your RDA of vitamin C taken care of.


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